Memory loss, less common in older Americans

Good news on gray matter: Memory loss and other cognitive impairment becoming less common in older Americans, U-M study finds; Better education, finances & cardiovascular care may be boosting brain health. – It appears that memory loss and thinking problems are becoming less common among older Americans. A new study shows a downward trend in the rate of “cognitive impairment” – the umbrella term for everything from significant memory loss to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease – among people aged 70 and older.

Vitamin B12, folate deficiency raises dementia risk

Changes in folate, vitamin B12 and homocysteine associated with incident dementia. – Folate deficiency is associated with a tripling in the risk of developing dementia among elderly people, suggests research published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry.

Lhx2 creator gene for brain tissue repair

UCI study identifies the specific role for gene linked to cortical development, cerebral cortex points to potential stem cell treatments. – University of California, Irvine researchers have identified a gene that is specifically responsible for generating the cerebral cortex, a finding that could lead to stem cell therapies to treat brain injuries and diseases such as stroke and Alzheimer’s.

Statins, cholesterol lowering drugs may not prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

A large US study suggests that statin, cholesterol lowering drug use does not lower the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). – Taking statins, which are cholesterol-lowering drugs, offers no protection against Alzheimer’s disease, revealed by US researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

Compstatin – new drug for vision loss, macular degeneration

UF scientists are testing the safety of experimental drug Compstatin for vision loss in macular degeneration patients. – University of Florida UF scientists are testing the safety of experimental drug Compstatin for vision loss in macular degeneration patients. In a first-of-its-kind safety research study, University of Florida researchers have injected an anti-inflammatory compound into the eye of a person with a sight-robbing disease.

Depressed girls can’t smell the roses

New Tel Aviv University (TAU) research links depression to loss of the sense of smell, suggesting that the blues may have biological roots. – Can’t smell the roses? Maybe you’re depressed. Smell too much like a rose yourself? Maybe you’ve got the same problem. Scientists from Tel Aviv University recently linked depression to a biological mechanism that affects the olfactory glands. It might explain why some women, without realizing it, wear too much perfume.

Brain imaging and genetic studies link thinking patterns to addiction

Scientists have for the first time identified brain sites that fire up more when people make impulsive decisions. In a study comparing brain activity of sober alcoholics and non-addicted people making financial decisions, the group of sober alcoholics showed significantly more “impulsive” neural activity. – Alcoholics are more impulsive than non-addicted people making financial decisions, revealed by researcher Charlotte Boettiger at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

White matter disease affects treatment in Alzheimer’s disease patients

There may be a difference in response to treatment in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) patients with and without white matter disease in selective areas of the brain.
– Researchers at Sunnybrook have shown that there may be a difference in response to treatment in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) patients with and without white matter disease in selective areas of the brain.

Aging brain failures to communicate

Cognitive decline in aging may be linked to disruption of communication between different regions of the brain.
– A team of Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers has shown that normal aging disrupts communication between different regions of the brain. The new research, which used advanced medical imaging techniques to look at the brain function of 93 healthy individuals from 18 to 93 years old, shows that this decline happens even in the absence of serious pathologies like Alzheimer’s disease.