Aspirin resistance increases heart attack, stroke risk

Increased risk of heart attack or stroke for patients who are resistant to aspirin — Aspirin ‘resistance’ and risk of cardiovascular morbidity : Systematic review and meta-analysis – Being resistant to aspirin makes patients four times more likely to suffer a heart attack, stroke or even die from a pre-existing heart condition, according to a study published in British Medical Journal, UK. The study relates to patients who are prescribed aspirin long term as a way of preventing clots from forming in the blood.

Vitamin D deficiency may increase heart disease risk

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with incident cardiovascular disease. Further clinical and experimental studies may be warranted to determine whether correction of vitamin D deficiency could contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. – The same vitamin D deficiency that can result in weak bones now has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, Framingham Heart Study researchers report in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

More teen women battling heart disease

At the age of 18, most young women are embarking on adulthood without a care in the world?health included. But experts at UC say that shouldn?t always be the case. – University of Cincinnati UC experts urge women to watch for warning signs associated with heart disease, a condition that is becoming more common, especially among women.

Obesity linked to decreased seatbelt use

Vanderbilt University psychologist reveals that obese people are less likely to use their seatbelts than the rest of the population, adding to the public health risks associated with this rapidly growing problem. – Obese people are less likely to use their seatbelts than the rest of the population, adding to the public health risks associated with this rapidly growing problem.

Quit Smoking – a Healthy Start to 2008

Smokers should make a new year’s resolution to give up the habit. The Australian Medical Association AMA is urging all smokers to put their health first in 2008. – The Australian Medical Association AMA is urging all smokers to put their health first in 2008 by making a New Year’s resolution to quit smoking for good.

Restless legs syndrome doubles risk of stroke and heart disease

Restless legs syndrome doubles risk of stroke and heart disease

Restless legs syndrome increases risk of stroke and heart diseases in patients because of increased blood pressure and heart rate due to periodic legs movements. – People with restless legs syndrome (RLS) are twice as likely to have a stroke or heart disease compared to people without RLS, and the risk is greatest in those with the most frequent and severe symptoms.

Psoriasis increases mortality risk

People with a severe form of the skin disease psoriasis are likely to die at a younger age than their healthy peers, according to a study at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia. – Patients with severe psoriasis appear to have an increased risk of death compared with patients without the skin condition, according to a report in the December issue of Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Most ancient case of tuberculosis found

Professor John Kappelman of The University of Texas at Austin reveals the most ancient evidence of the tuberculosis disease has been found in a 500,000-year-old human fossil from Turkey.
– Although most scientists believe tuberculosis emerged only several thousand years ago, new research from The University of Texas at Austin reveals the most ancient evidence of the disease has been found in a 500,000-year-old human fossil from Turkey.

Diesel exhaust fumes affect people with asthma

This is the first study to investigate in a real-life setting, outside of the laboratory, if traffic fumes make symptoms worse for people with asthma. Two thirds of people with asthma believe this to be the case.
– Diesel exhaust fumes on polluted streets have a measurable effect on people with asthma, according to the first study looking at exhausts and asthma in a real-life setting, published on 6 December in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Reduce excess salt in food

American Medical Association asked the FDA to set strict limits on salt in processed foods and work to better educate the public on the benefits of a low-sodium diet.
– In an effort to reduce the burden of heart disease and stroke, the American Medical Association (AMA) testified to the Food and Drug Administration urging immediate action to reduce excess salt in food. The AMA asked the FDA to set strict limits on salt in processed foods and work to better educate the public on the benefits of a low-sodium diet.