New blood test diagnoses heart attacks faster

A new test to assess a whether or not someone is having a heart attack upon arriving in the emergency room was safe and effective, ruling out heart attack in emergency room patients faster than a conventional method, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. The new high-sensitivity blood test for … Read more

Women doctors best for women with heart attacks

If you’re having a heart attack and you’re a woman, hope a female doctor greets you in the emergency room. A review of nearly 582,000 heart attack cases over 19 years showed female patients had a significantly higher survival rate when a woman treated them in the ER, according to Seth Carnahan of Washington University … Read more

Allergy to fruits treated with antibiotic streptomycin pesticides

Farm Antibiotics May Be Linked to Food Allergies — Some food allergies may be connected to pesticides – People with food allergies always have to watch what they eat. Now, they may have to watch what their fruits and vegetables eat, as it seems it’s possible to have an allergic reaction to antibiotic residues in food.

4 drugs accounted for two thirds of emergency hospitalizations in US

Elderly at risk of hospitalizations from key medications — Promoting safe use of blood thinners and diabetes medications can protect patients – Handful of drugs are responsible for most emergency room visits by patients in US, revealed by CDC researchers (US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) in a recent study.

Smoking ban reduces emergency room admissions

Smoking ban reduces emergency room admissions – Workplace smoking bans are gaining ground globally, and one study has shown that they may have significant health effects. The study, conducted by researchers in Dublin, found that emergency room admissions due to respiratory illness dropped significantly in Ireland after the implementation of a workplace smoking ban, compared to admissions that took place before the ban went into effect.

Healthy lifestyle choices lower risk of a first stroke 80%

Updated guidelines include new research, advances in stroke prevention — American Heart Association scientific statement – Healthy lifestyle choices and emergency room interventions can help prevent first-time strokes, according to revised American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guidelines.

Second stroke often follows within hours of first

Suffer Stroke Symptoms? Second Strokes Often Follow Within Hours – About half of all people who have a major stroke following a warning stroke (a transient ischemic attack or mild stroke) have it within 24 hours of the first event, according to research published in the June 2, 2009, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Stroke treatment can benefit patients up to 4.5 hours

Stanford study expands window for effective stroke treatment – stroke treatment limit extended to 4.5 hours after first symptom. – Once symptoms start, there’s only a tiny window of time for stroke victims to get life-saving treatment. Now, research from the Stanford University School of Medicine has cracked that window open a bit wider.

Women with chest pain get no proper treatment from paramedics

Women with chest pain less likely then men to get proper treatment from paramedics – Penn study shows gender disparities in pre-hospital care. – Women with chest pain are less likely than male patients to receive recommended, proven therapies while en route to the hospital, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Scorpion antivenom results in prompt recovery from scorpion sting

University of Arizona research on scorpion antivenom published in NEJM. Antivenom results in prompt recovery from nerve poisoning. – Youngsters suffering severe nerve poisoning following a scorpion sting recover completely and quickly if a scorpion-specific antivenom is administered, according to a study conducted by researchers from The University of Arizona and reported in the May 14 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

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