Massage eases pain and anxiety after surgery

Massage can ease pain after surgery and may complement the use of drugs for patients, US researchers said. – A 20-minute evening back massage may help relieve pain and reduce anxiety following major surgery when given in addition to pain medications, according to a report in the December issue of Archives of Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Psoriasis increases mortality risk

People with a severe form of the skin disease psoriasis are likely to die at a younger age than their healthy peers, according to a study at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia. – Patients with severe psoriasis appear to have an increased risk of death compared with patients without the skin condition, according to a report in the December issue of Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Swad brand sindoor contains high levels of lead

Swad brand sindoor contains high levels of lead

FDA is warning consumers not to use Swad brand sindoor because the product contains high levels of lead, leading to lead toxicity or lead poisoning.
– The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning consumers not to use 3.5 oz. packages of Swad brand sindoor, an orange or red powder used in some traditional South Asian Pacific ceremonies that is applied to the face or scalp, imported by Raja Foods LLC of Skokie, Illinois because the product contains high levels of lead. Although the product was not intended to be sold for food use, its labeling is confusing and implies that it may be used as food.

Cows milk may cause Crohn’s disease

Mycobacterium paratuberculosis found in cows milk may cause Crohn’s disease in humans, revealed by researchers at the University of Liverpool, UK.
– Researchers at the University of Liverpool have found how a bacterium, known to cause illness in cattle, may cause Crohn’s disease in humans. Crohn’s is a condition that affects one in 800 people in the UK and causes chronic intestinal inflammation, leading to pain, bleeding and diarrhoea.

Sickle cell anemia treated with stem cells

Using a new type of stem cells made from ordinary skin cells, US researchers said they treated mice with sickle cell anemia.
– MIT researchers have successfully treated mice with sickle-cell anemia in a process that begins by directly reprogramming the mice’s own cells to an embryonic-stem-cell-like state, without the use of eggs.

Ebola virus outbreak in Uganda worsens, says WHO

The number of suspected cases of Ebola haemorrhagic fever in western Uganda has almost doubled in the past 10 days, and four health-care workers are now among the fatalities, the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) reported.
– The number of suspected cases of Ebola haemorrhagic fever in the Bundibugyo District of western Uganda has now risen to 93, including 22 fatalities. Laboratory analysis has confirmed the presence of a new species of the virus in 9 of these cases.

Treatment of HIV associated Lipodystrophy Syndrome

The HIV/HAART-associated Lipodystrophy Syndrome is a common side-effect of antiretroviral medications to treat HIV infection.
– Researchers in Montreal and Boston have identified a potential new treatment for the HIV/HAART*-associated Lipodystrophy Syndrome. This syndrome is a common side-effect of anti-retroviral medications to treat HIV infection.

Asacol found effective in ulcerative colitis, proctitis

Study data show Asacol (Mesalamine) is effective in treating all extents of ulcerative colitis including isolated proctitis. Findings reinforce the benefits of Asacol for ulcerative colitis patients.
– Data from two Phase III clinical trials support that Asacol, an oral, non-steroidal medication that belongs to the class of agents known as 5-aminosalicylic acids (5-ASAs), is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for patients with all extents of ulcerative colitis (UC), including isolated proctitis.

Colon cancer screenings could pose harm to some

R. Scott Braithwaite, M.D., and his colleagues developed a new method of evaluating medical screening tests like colonoscopy, called the “payoff time,” which is the minimum amount of time it takes for the benefits from a test to exceed its harms (i.e., its complications and side effects).
– Even though current guidelines advocate colorectal cancer screenings for those with severe illnesses, they may bring little benefit and may actually pose harm, according to a recent study by Yale School of Medicine researchers published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Sulforaphane in broccoli could treat genetic skin disorder

A recent paper presented at American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting highlighted that natural compound sulforaphane in broccoli could treat devastating genetic skin blistering disorder called epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS).
– The compound sulforaphane whose natural precursors are found at high levels in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables has been hailed for its chemopreventive powers against cancer. Now sulforaphane has demonstrated new skills in treating a genetic skin blistering disorder called epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), Pierre Coulombe and colleagues at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore report at the American Society for Cell Biology 47th Annual Meeting.