Obesity may be bad for bone health

Obesity and being over-weight may be bad for bone health, and childhood obesity could have a significant, long lasting negative impact on the skeleton. – Obesity may be bad for bone health, revealed by researchers at the University of Georgia. Being overweight is a known risk factor for heart disease, diabetes and a host of other health conditions. Now, obesity and over-weight may also be bad for bone health.

Right diet and lifestyle may help infertile women

Right dietary choices and the right amount of physical activity in daily life may increase probability of becoming fertile if one is experiencing problems with ovulation and infertility. – Women who followed a combination of five or more lifestyle factors, including changing specific aspects of their diets, experienced more than 80 percent less relative risk of infertility due to ovulatory disorders compared to women who engaged in none of the factors, according to a paper published in the November 1, 2007, issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

HIV AIDS drug cost trends in Brazil

Brazil facing significant challenges with the rising cost of providing universal access to HIV/AIDS treatment. – AIDS continues to be a staggering global public health problem. The World Health Organization estimates that two million people in developing countries (or 25% of those in need in developing countries) receive treatment known as HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy), more commonly known as “AIDS cocktails.”

Study of environmental chemicals in pregnant women and their babies

Canada is investing more than $4 million in a largest study of environmental chemicals in pregnant women and their babies. – The Government of Canada announced a $3.9 million investment in Canada’s largest study of environmental chemicals in pregnant women and their babies. To mark National Child Day and the one-year anniversary of the Chemicals Management Plan on December 8, the Honourable Tony Clement, Minister of Health, Canada announced this important step.

Zyrtec for nonprescription use in adults and children

Nonprescription drug Zyrtec, cetirizine HCl, is approved for the temporary relief of symptoms due to hay fever or other respiratory allergies. – Different formulations of the nonprescription drug Zyrtec (cetirizine HCl) is approved for the temporary relief of symptoms due to hay fever or other respiratory allergies (sneezing; runny nose; itchy, watery eyes; itchy throat or nose) in adults and children 2 years of age and older.

RGS13 protein may play role in suppressing allergic reactions

A protein in humans known as RGS13 suppresses allergic reactions, including the severe, life-threatening allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis. – According to scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), a protein in mice known as RGS13 suppresses allergic reactions, including the severe, life-threatening allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis.

$2 million of potentially harmful cosmetic eye product seized in US

Harmful cosmetic eye products may increase the risk of optic nerve damage, macular edema, uveitis leading to decreased vision and blindness. – At the request of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Marshals seized 12,682 applicator tubes of Age Intervention Eyelash, a product that may, in some users, lead to decreased vision. Authorities said the sales value of the seized tubes is approximately $2 million.

Nexavar approved for patients with inoperable liver cancer

Anticancer drug Nexavar raised survival period in inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma patients suffering from this kind of liver cancer. – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Nexavar (sorafenib) for use in patients with a form of liver cancer known as hepatocellular carcinoma, when the cancer is inoperable. Nexavar was originally approved in 2005 for the treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma, a form of kidney cancer.

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