Hazards of CT scans overstated in NEJM

A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine has suggested that the radiation dose from CT scans is a cause for concern, and CT scans should only be used judiciously and when medically necessary.
– A recent article by Drs. David Brenner and Eric Hall in the New England Journal of Medicine has suggested that the radiation dose from CT scans is a cause for concern, and may be responsible for a small percentage of cancer deaths in the United States. While the conclusions of the Brenner article have been portrayed by some as conclusive, in reality the scientific community remains divided in regards to the radiation dose effects of CT.

Predicting hip fracture risk in postmenopausal women

A team of UC Davis researchers has developed a method that assesses nearly a dozen factors to predict the five-year risk of hip fractures in postmenopausal women.
– To help doctors predict the five-year risk of hip fractures in their postmenopausal patients, a team of UC Davis researchers has developed a method that assesses nearly a dozen factors, including age, ethnicity and level of physical activity.

Folic acid reduces alcohol-related damage in alcoholics

A new study with groundbreaking public health implications for treating alcoholism and preventing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome has shown that a byproduct of methanol, a contaminant found in many alcoholic beverages, causes neurotoxicity that can be mitigated by folic acid.
– Folic acid found helpful for treating alcoholism and preventing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, revealed by researchers in a recent study.

Immune system responsible for increased inflammation in diabetes patients

Immune system found responsible for increased inflammation in diabetes patients. With good diabetes control, this inflammation may be reduced, possibly resulting in a reduction of cardiovascular disease as well.
– Researchers at UC Davis Health System have discovered a novel pathway that results in increased inflammation of blood vessels in patients with type 1 diabetes. Their findings suggest that, with good diabetes control, this inflammation may be reduced, possibly resulting in a reduction of cardiovascular disease as well.

PET imaging more accurate in lung cancer staging

For more accurate staging of lung cancer, PET imaging founds to be a useful diagnostic tool. Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death and early accurate diagnosis provides improved treatment for patients and the best chance for long term survival.
– Positron emission tomography (PET) is a useful diagnostic tool that supports the need for more accurate staging of lung cancer and improved treatment for patients, concludes an extensive systematic review published online in Journal of National Cancer Institute.

Obesity may be bad for bone health

Obesity and being over-weight may be bad for bone health, and childhood obesity could have a significant, long lasting negative impact on the skeleton. – Obesity may be bad for bone health, revealed by researchers at the University of Georgia. Being overweight is a known risk factor for heart disease, diabetes and a host of other health conditions. Now, obesity and over-weight may also be bad for bone health.

Right diet and lifestyle may help infertile women

Right dietary choices and the right amount of physical activity in daily life may increase probability of becoming fertile if one is experiencing problems with ovulation and infertility. – Women who followed a combination of five or more lifestyle factors, including changing specific aspects of their diets, experienced more than 80 percent less relative risk of infertility due to ovulatory disorders compared to women who engaged in none of the factors, according to a paper published in the November 1, 2007, issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

HIV AIDS drug cost trends in Brazil

Brazil facing significant challenges with the rising cost of providing universal access to HIV/AIDS treatment. – AIDS continues to be a staggering global public health problem. The World Health Organization estimates that two million people in developing countries (or 25% of those in need in developing countries) receive treatment known as HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy), more commonly known as “AIDS cocktails.”

Study of environmental chemicals in pregnant women and their babies

Canada is investing more than $4 million in a largest study of environmental chemicals in pregnant women and their babies. – The Government of Canada announced a $3.9 million investment in Canada’s largest study of environmental chemicals in pregnant women and their babies. To mark National Child Day and the one-year anniversary of the Chemicals Management Plan on December 8, the Honourable Tony Clement, Minister of Health, Canada announced this important step.

Zyrtec for nonprescription use in adults and children

Nonprescription drug Zyrtec, cetirizine HCl, is approved for the temporary relief of symptoms due to hay fever or other respiratory allergies. – Different formulations of the nonprescription drug Zyrtec (cetirizine HCl) is approved for the temporary relief of symptoms due to hay fever or other respiratory allergies (sneezing; runny nose; itchy, watery eyes; itchy throat or nose) in adults and children 2 years of age and older.

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