Tussionex cough medicine with hydrocodone warning

US FDA health agency gives new safety information on proper use of Tussionex as a cough suppressant. – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued an alert on the safe and correct use of Tussionex Pennkinetic Extended-Release Suspension in response to numerous reports of adverse events–including death–associated with the misuse and inappropriate use of this potent cough medication.

7000 pediatric emergency visits linked to cough and cold medication

CDC study estimates 7,000 pediatric emergency departments visits linked to cough and cold medication. Unsupervised ingestion accounts for 66 percent of incidents. – An estimated 7,000 children ages 11 and younger are treated in hospital emergency departments each year because of cough and cold medications, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Approximately two-thirds of those incidents were due to unsupervised ingestion (i.e., children taking the medication without a parent’s knowledge).

Snoring may lead to chronic bronchitis

This prospective study observed that snoring is associated with chronic bronchitis, and findings provide support for the hypothesis that snoring influences the development of chronic bronchitis. – Snoring is more prevalent in patients with chronic bronchitis than in persons without it. Few studies have examined the effect of snoring on chronic bronchitis. Frequent snoring appears to be associated with the development of chronic bronchitis, according to a report in the January 28 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Consumer Healthcare supports FDA over OTC cough and cold medicines withdrawal

FDA Bulletin on Kids’ Oral, Over-the-Counter Cough and Cold Reaffirms Industry’s October 2007 Voluntary Withdrawal; Agency announcement reinforces need for increased communication with consumers. – On behalf of the leading makers of over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medicines, the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) offered its support for U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decision against the use of oral OTC cough and cold medicines in children under the age of two.

Use OTC cough and cold products with care

US FDA strongly recommends that over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold products should not be used for infants and children under 2 years of age because serious and potentially life-threatening side effects could occur. – US health agency FDA is recommending that over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold products should not be used to treat infants and children less than 2 years of age because serious and potentially life-threatening side effects can occur from such use. OTC cough and cold products include decongestants, expectorants, antihistamines, and antitussives (cough suppressants) for the treatment of colds.

Chest pain – common sign of heart attack for women

Several recent reports have found that women are more likely to have other symptoms of a heart attack but chest pain is the most common sign of heart attack for most women. – Chest pain or discomfort has long been regarded as the most common early warning sign of a heart attack for both men and women. However, several recent reports have found that women are more likely to have other symptoms of a heart attack. A new study looked at the available evidence and concluded that chest pain is the most common sign of heart attack for most women.

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