Caffeine reduces exercise induced asthma symptoms

Caffeine shown as effective at reducing exercise-induced asthma symptoms as an albuterol inhaler – An Indiana University study found that the ingestion of caffeine within an hour of exercise can reduce the symptoms of exercise induced asthma (EIA).

Teachers’ ignorance is putting children with asthma at risk

Teachers? ignorance is putting children with asthma at risk – Introduce clear guidelines for schools on their responsibilities for supporting children with asthma. – A disturbing three quarters of teachers are not completely confident about what to do if a child in their class has a potentially life-threatening asthma attack, yet asthma is the most common long-term condition affecting children in the UK and on average there are two children with asthma in every classroom.

Asthma in obese more severe

A new research from University of Otago revealed that the obesity can worsen the impact of asthma and may also increase its severity, published in American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. – Obesity can worsen the impact of asthma and may also increase its severity, according to new University of Otago research.

Pregnant women need more help to quit smoking

Pregnant women need more help to quit smoking. Midwives and doctors should do more to encourage pregnant women to give up smoking. – Midwives and doctors should do more to encourage pregnant women to give up smoking, research suggests. A survey by the Auckland Tobacco Control Research Centre (ATCRC) at The University of Auckland showed that only 11% of midwives and 71% of GPs suggest women abstain completely from smoking during pregnancy.

Diesel exhaust fumes affect people with asthma

This is the first study to investigate in a real-life setting, outside of the laboratory, if traffic fumes make symptoms worse for people with asthma. Two thirds of people with asthma believe this to be the case.
– Diesel exhaust fumes on polluted streets have a measurable effect on people with asthma, according to the first study looking at exhausts and asthma in a real-life setting, published on 6 December in the New England Journal of Medicine.