Pregnancy may make women forgetful for a year

In pregnancy woman’s normal routines are disrupted and she can suffer sleep deprivation after the birth; either of these things can affect cognitive performance, and may make women slightly forgetful for a year after giving birth. – Many women believe that they become more forgetful during pregnancy: a new study by Australian researchers suggests that they are right – and that their memory can be significantly impaired for at least a year after giving birth.

Stress in pregnancy may lead to schizophrenia in offspring

This population-based study suggests that severe stress to a mother during the first trimester may alter the risk of schizophrenia in offspring. This finding is consistent with ecological evidence from whole populations exposed to severe stressors and suggests that environment may influence neurodevelopment at the feto-placental-maternal interface. – Most societies believe that a mother’s psychological state can influence her unborn baby. Children of women who undergo an extremely stressful event-such as the death of a close relative-during the first trimester of pregnancy appear more likely to develop schizophrenia, according to a report in the February issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Genetic mutation increases risk of preterm birth

Mutations in immune system gene linked to placental injury common in preterm babies – Genetic mutations in the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene appear to have significant association with inflammatory injury to the placenta and developing baby, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh’s department of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences report at the 28th annual meeting of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Scientific sessions continue through Saturday, Feb. 2, at the Dallas Hyatt Regency at Reunion.

Overweight pregnant women may have fatter children

Obesity, overweight during pregnancy may be more likely to have fatter children susceptible to chronic health problems. – Mothers-to-be beware. Women who are overweight during pregnancy may be more likely to have fatter children susceptible to chronic health problems, University of New South Wales (UNSW) research shows.

Prenatal starvation may lead to addiction later in life

Babies conceived during a period of famine are at risk of developing addictions later in life, according to new research published in the international journal Addiction. – Babies conceived during a period of famine are at risk of developing addictions later in life, and a range of chronic disorders including physical conditions such as coronary heart disease, and psychiatric ones such as schizophrenia and clinical depression.

Maternity care in UK varies – Healthcare Commission review

The Healthcare Commission assessed NHS’ maternity services in three areas – clinical focus, women-centred care, and efficiency and capability – using 25 indicators of performance. – The Healthcare Commission has ranked one in four NHS maternity services as “best performing” in a national review published today, but the comparative review, the most comprehensive assessment ever of maternity services in England, also found significant variations in the quality of care across the country.

Caffeine during pregnancy increases miscarriage risk

If you are pregnant and need caffeine to get you going, try keeping it to one cup or less a day. Avoiding it may be even better. – High doses of daily caffeine during pregnancy ? whether from coffee, tea, caffeinated soda or hot chocolate ? cause an increased risk of miscarriage, according a new study by the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research. The study controlled, for the first time, pregnancy-related symptoms of nausea, vomiting and caffeine aversion that tended to interfere with the determination of caffeine’s true effect on miscarriage risk.

Study of environmental chemicals in pregnant women and their babies

Canada is investing more than $4 million in a largest study of environmental chemicals in pregnant women and their babies. – The Government of Canada announced a $3.9 million investment in Canada’s largest study of environmental chemicals in pregnant women and their babies. To mark National Child Day and the one-year anniversary of the Chemicals Management Plan on December 8, the Honourable Tony Clement, Minister of Health, Canada announced this important step.