Chronic fatigue syndrome is not psychological disease

Scientists discover robust evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome is a biological illness – Immune signatures in blood point to distinct disease stages, open door to better diagnosis and treatment – Researchers identified distinct immune changes in patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, known medically as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME/CFS) or systemic exertion intolerance disease.

Abuse in childhood may lead to migraine

Abuse in childhood linked to migraine and other pain disorders – Findings suggest abuse is a risk factor for chronic headache – Researchers from the American Headache Society’s Women’s Issues Section Research Consortium found that incidence of childhood maltreatment, especially emotional abuse and neglect, are prevalent in migraine patients.

XMRV retrovirus linked to chronic fatigue syndrome

Consortium of Researchers Discover Retroviral Link to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome – A retrovirus named XMRV is frequently present in the blood of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), revealed by researchers. This discovery could be a major step in the discovery of vital treatment options for millions of patients.

Chronic fatigue syndrome linked to childhood trauma

Biological link connects childhood trauma and risk for chronic fatigue syndrome – Childhood trauma is a potent risk factor for development of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), according to a study by researchers at Emory University School of Medicine and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Low intensity exercise reduces fatigue symptoms by 65 percent

Sedentary people who regularly complain of fatigue can increase their energy levels by 20 percent and decrease their fatigue by 65 percent by engaging in regular, low intensity exercise. – Sedentary people who regularly complain of fatigue can increase their energy levels by 20 percent and decrease their fatigue by 65 percent by engaging in regular, low intensity exercise, according to a new University of Georgia study.

Happily married women are less stressful

Here’s a novel idea for unwinding after a stressful day at the office: Find a happy marriage. That’s the suggestion from a new UCLA study that tracked levels of cortisol, a key stress hormone, among 30 Los Angeles married couples. – Happily married women are less stressful with better mental health, revealed by UCLA researchers. They tracked levels of cortisol, a key stress hormone, among 30 Los Angeles married couples.

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