Heart and stroke death rates steadily decline in US

American Heart Association goals to reduce deaths from heart disease and stroke by 2010 have been virtually met. – In an appropriate prelude to American Heart Month, which is just ahead in February, new mortality data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that, since 1999, coronary heart disease and stroke age-adjusted death rates are down by 25.8 percent and 24.4 percent, respectively.

Aspirin resistance increases heart attack, stroke risk

Increased risk of heart attack or stroke for patients who are resistant to aspirin — Aspirin ‘resistance’ and risk of cardiovascular morbidity : Systematic review and meta-analysis – Being resistant to aspirin makes patients four times more likely to suffer a heart attack, stroke or even die from a pre-existing heart condition, according to a study published in British Medical Journal, UK. The study relates to patients who are prescribed aspirin long term as a way of preventing clots from forming in the blood.

Immune system can help heal patients with heart failure

Immune system can help heal patients with heart failure

The ability to change or modulate the patient?s immune response has now been shown to be attainable as well as successful in treating certain stages of heart failure. – Modifying the immune system of a patient with heart failure reduces the patient’s risk of death and the need for hospitalization, according to research published in recent edition of The Lancet.

Calcium supplements may increase heart attacks in postmenopausal women

Calcium supplements or high calcium intakes may increase heart attacks in postmenopausal women, increased risk of myocardial infarction outweighs the reduction in fractures in older women. – Calcium is an important component of bone, and a sufficient intake of calcium is needed for bone homoeostasis. Calcium supplements can reduce the risk of fractures in elderly women, but high calcium intakes or calcium supplements may increase the risk of heart attack in healthy postmenopausal women.

More teen women battling heart disease

At the age of 18, most young women are embarking on adulthood without a care in the world?health included. But experts at UC say that shouldn?t always be the case. – University of Cincinnati UC experts urge women to watch for warning signs associated with heart disease, a condition that is becoming more common, especially among women.

Stress may condition heart to survive heart attack

University of Cincinnati researchers reveal that people who experience brief periods of blocked blood flow may be better conditioned to survive a full-blown heart attack later. – People who experience brief periods of blocked blood flow may be better conditioned to survive a full-blown heart attack later, according to new research from the University of Cincinnati (UC).

Education programs lead to better health in heart patients

University of Michigan researchers revealed that heart patients find education programs lead to better health. – Older women heart patients benefit from educational programs as a supplement to clinical care to help significantly lower cardiac symptoms, lose weight and increase physical activity, a new study shows.

Chest pain – common sign of heart attack for women

Several recent reports have found that women are more likely to have other symptoms of a heart attack but chest pain is the most common sign of heart attack for most women. – Chest pain or discomfort has long been regarded as the most common early warning sign of a heart attack for both men and women. However, several recent reports have found that women are more likely to have other symptoms of a heart attack. A new study looked at the available evidence and concluded that chest pain is the most common sign of heart attack for most women.

Living embryonic heart cells prevent cardiac arrhythmias

Researchers implant embryonic cells into damaged hearts and prevent life-threatening heart arrhythmias.
– When researchers at Cornell, the University of Bonn and the University of Pittsburgh transplanted living embryonic heart cells into cardiac tissue of mice that had suffered heart attacks, the mice became resistant to cardiac arrhythmias, thereby avoiding one of the most dangerous and fatal consequences of heart attacks.

Reduce excess salt in food

American Medical Association asked the FDA to set strict limits on salt in processed foods and work to better educate the public on the benefits of a low-sodium diet.
– In an effort to reduce the burden of heart disease and stroke, the American Medical Association (AMA) testified to the Food and Drug Administration urging immediate action to reduce excess salt in food. The AMA asked the FDA to set strict limits on salt in processed foods and work to better educate the public on the benefits of a low-sodium diet.