Vitamin E may slow functional decline in Alzheimer’s Disease patients

Vitamin E May Delay Decline in Mild-to-Moderate Alzheimer’s Disease — Study Shows Benefit in Activities of Daily Living and Savings in Caregiver Time with Vitamin E – A new research suggests that alpha tocepherol, fat-soluble Vitamin E and antioxidant, may slow functional decline (problems with daily activities such as shopping, preparing meals, planning, and traveling) in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s disease and decrease caregiver burden.

Concussions may be related to Alzheimer’s disease

Are concussions related to Alzheimer’s disease? – A history of concussion involving at least a momentary loss of consciousness may be related to the buildup of Alzheimer’s-associated plaques in the brain, revealed by researchers in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Lower blood sugar good for brain

Lower Blood Sugars May Be Good for the Brain – Even for people within the normal range of blood sugar, lowering their blood sugar levels could be a promising strategy for preventing memory problems and cognitive decline as they age.

Endurance exercise improves brain health

Scientists identify protein linking exercise to brain health – A protein that is increased by endurance exercise has been isolated and given to non-exercising mice, in which it turned on genes that promote brain health and encourage the growth of new nerves involved in learning and memory.

Mind wandering may lead to insomnia

Brain imaging study reveals the wandering mind behind insomnia — Study is the first to find functional MRI differences in working memory in people with primary insomnia – A new brain imaging study may help explain why people with insomnia often complain that they struggle to concentrate during the day even when objective evidence of a cognitive problem is lacking.

Age Related Memory Loss is reversible

A Major Cause of Age-Related Memory Loss Identified — Study points to possible treatments and confirms distinction between memory loss due to aging and that of Alzheimer’s – The researchers have identified a protein-RbAp48-that, when increased in aged wild-type mice, improves memory back to that of young wild-type mice. They have found that deficiency of a protein called RbAp48 in the hippocampus is a significant contributor to age-related memory loss and that this form of memory loss is reversible.

Regular long term exercise is good for sleep

Exercise is no quick cure for insomnia – Hitting the treadmill today won’t help you sleep tonight; it takes 4 months to kick in – Exercise is a common prescription for insomnia. But spending 45 minutes on the treadmill one day won’t translate into better sleep that night. “If you have insomnia you won’t exercise yourself into sleep right away,” said lead study author Kelly Glazer Baron, a clinical psychologist and director of the behavioral sleep program at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Mentally stimulating activities boost brainpower in old age

Does being a bookworm boost your brainpower in old age? – New research suggests that reading books, writing and participating in brain-stimulating activities at any age may preserve memory. “Our study suggests that exercising your brain by taking part in activities such as these across a person’s lifetime, from childhood through old age, is important for brain health in old age,” said study author Robert S. Wilson, PhD, with Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

Stem cell transplant may restore memory

Stem cell transplant restores memory, learning in mice – A study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is the first to show that human stem cells can successfully implant themselves in the brain and then heal neurological deficits, says senior author Su-Chun Zhang, a professor of neuroscience and neurology.

Propranolol may improve working memory in autism patients

Drug could improve working memory of people with autism, study finds – People with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often have trouble communicating and interacting with others because they process language, facial expressions and social cues differently. Previously, researchers found that propranolol, a drug commonly used to treat high blood pressure, anxiety and panic, could improve the language abilities and social functioning of people with an ASD. Now, University of Missouri investigators say the prescription drug also could help improve the working memory abilities of individuals with autism.