Chinese exercise Tai chi relieves knee pain

Ancient chinese exercise Tai chi is found effective in the treatment of pain and physical impairment in people with severe knee osteoarthritis. – Tai chi is effective in the treatment of pain and physical impairment in people with severe knee osteoarthritis, according to research presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in San Francisco, Calif.

Glucosamine, chondroitin no better than placebo in osteoarthritis

The dietary supplements glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate no better than placebo in slowing cartilage loss in knees of osteoarthritis patients. – The dietary supplements glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate performed no better than placebo in slowing the rate of cartilage loss in the knees of osteoarthritis patients, revealed by researchers at University of Utah.

Arthroscopy may not help osteoarthritis patients

A landmark study conducted in London, Canada at The University of Western Ontario and Lawson Health Research Institute shows that a routinely practiced knee surgery is ineffective at reducing joint pain or improving joint function for sufferers of osteoarthritis. – Arthroscopic surgery for osteoarthritis of the knee provides no additional benefit to optimized physical and medical therapy, revealed by researchers in a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) issue of Sept. 11, 2008.

Joint replacement improves osteoarthritis in older adults

Elderly patients who had hip or knee replacements for severe OA took several weeks to recover but experienced excellent long-term outcomes. – Older adults who have hip or knee replacement surgery for severe osteoarthritis may take several weeks to recover but appear to have excellent long-term outcomes, according to a report in the July 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Knee surgery referral to men more

Disparity in the use of medical or surgical interventions is an important health care issue, and this research suggests a gender bias in the treatment of patients who may need orthopedic surgery. Gender bias may affect care of people with osteoarthritis. – Physicians and surgeons recommend knee replacement surgery to men more than female patients complaining of knee pain, revealed by canadian researchers highlighting unconscious prejudices among doctors.

Glucosamine no better than placebo in reducing hip pain

Although many patients use glucosamine to treat osteoarthritis, available studies have reported inconsistent effects of glucosamine on symptoms and joint changes. In addition, previous studies have more often included patients with knee than with hip osteoarthritis. – A new, two-year, randomized, placebo-controlled trial found that glucosamine sulfate was no better than placebo in controlling hip pain, the ability to do normal activities and the progression of hip osteoarthritis. Glucosamine is a natural substance found in healthy joint cartilage.

Don’t postpone knee-replacement surgery

Osteoarthritis of the knee is the most common cause of disability among Americans. It’s a disease of age that affects more women than men on a 60-40 basis. – Research at the University of Delaware indicates that women wait longer to pursue knee-replacement surgery than men do.

Osteoarthritis risk linked to shorter index finger

University of Nottingham researchers revealed that people whose index finger is shorter than their ring finger are at higher risk of osteoarthritis. – People whose index finger is shorter than their ring finger are at higher risk of osteoarthritis, a new University of Nottingham study has found.