Obesity counseling should focus on neurobehavioral processes

Obesity counseling should focus on neurobehavioral processes, not personal choice, researchers say – Current approaches to dietary counseling for obesity are heavily rooted in the notion of personal choice and will power ? the ability to choose healthy foods and portion sizes consistent with weight loss while foregoing sweets and comfort foods. According to preventive medicine and behavioral experts at Rush University Medical Center, research supports a new counseling approach that views obesity as a result of neurobehavioral processes – ways in which the brain controls eating behavior in response to cues in the environment.

Pfizer drug reduces breast cancer in high risk women

UB played major role in study on drug that reduces breast cancer in high-risk women — Buffalo enrolled more women than any other study site – The drug exemestane significantly reduces the risk of breast cancer in high-risk, postmenopausal women is the result of an international, randomized double-blind phase III clinical trial in which University at Buffalo researchers and hundreds of Western New York women played a critical role, revealed at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting.

Smoking increases depressive symptoms in teens

Smoking increases depressive symptoms in teens — Universities of Toronto and Montreal study published in Addictive Behaviors – While some teenagers may puff on cigarettes to ‘self-medicate’ against the blues, scientists at the University of Toronto and the University of Montreal have found that smoking may actually increase depressive symptoms in some adolescents.

Alcohol consumption may protect against Alzheimer’s Disease

Alcohol consumption may protect against risk of AD, particularly in female nonsmokers — According to new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease – A new study published this month in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease suggests a protective effect of alcohol consumption on the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, particularly in women who do not smoke.

Air pollution exposure at schools linked to childhood asthma

Air Pollution Exposure at Schools Linked to Childhood Asthma – Living near major highways has been linked to childhood asthma, but a new study led by researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of USC suggests that traffic-related pollution near schools is also contributing to the development of asthma in children.

Vaccinate against H1N1 Flu and Seasonal Flu

It is not too late for those who have not been immunized against the novel H1N1 influenza A virus or seasonal influenza to protect themselves from a potentially serious and possibly fatal illness. – It is not too late for those who have not been immunized against the novel H1N1 influenza A virus or seasonal influenza to protect themselves from a potentially serious and possibly fatal illness.

Cancer mortality declined in Europe

New figures on cancer in Europe show a steady decline in mortality but big variations — Large variations in mortality exist between countries and between men and women – New figures on deaths from cancer in Europe show a steady decline in mortality between the periods 1990-1994 and 2000-2004. Deaths from all cancers in the European Union (EU) between these two periods fell by nine percent in men and eight percent in women, with a large drop among the middle-aged population.

Public smoking bans reduce heart attacks

Banning smoking in public places and workplaces is good for the heart — Inhaling secondhand smoke greatly increases risk of heart attack, even among young and nonsmokers. – Public smoking bans appear to significantly reduce the risk of heart attacks, particularly among younger individuals and nonsmokers, revealed by researchers in a new study.

15% preschoolers have high levels of depression and anxiety

Depression and anxiety affect up to 15 percent of preschoolers — International investigation published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. – Almost 15 percent of preschoolers have atypically high levels of depression and anxiety, revealed by researchers in a new study published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

Parental stress may increase asthma risk in children

US study finds link between parental stress, air pollution, and children?s risk for developing asthma. – Children with stressed out parents may be more susceptible to developing asthma (Childhood asthma) associated with environmental triggers such as high levels of traffic-related pollution and tobacco smoke, revealed by researchers.