New breast imaging BSGI effective in detection of breast cancers

New breast imaging technology – breast specific gamma imaging – BSGI targets hard-to-detect cancers – Breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) is effective in the detection of cancers not found on mammograms or by clinical exam, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Teens don’t care about skin cancer messages

Australian teens continue to put themselves at unnecessary risk of skin cancer by spending excessive time in the sun and forgetting to protect themselves. – Teens continue to put themselves at unnecessary risk of skin cancer by spending excessive time in the sun and forgetting to protect themselves, according to new Cancer Council research.

Skin odor may diagnose skin cancer

Skin cancer could be diagnosed by the distinctive chemical odor it gives off, say US researchers. – Chemists described the first identification of a specific “odor profile” for skin cancer, a discovery that could form the basis of a rapid, non-invasive test for diagnosing the most common type of cancer in the United States.

Moisturisers may increase skin cancer risk

Moisturisers used by millions of people may be increasing the risk of common skin cancer like melanoma. – Moisturisers used by millions of people may be increasing the risk of common skin cancer like melanoma, hinted by researchers. However, the researchers had cautioned that the experiments were carried out on mice, but the majority of moisturisers have not gone through skin cancer safety checks.

Prostate cancer screening for men over 75 not required

US Preventive Services Task Force updates prostate cancer screening recommendations; Task Force finds no screening benefit for men over 75. – The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), updating its 2002 report, now recommends against routine prostate cancer screening for men over the age of 75. More evidence is needed to determine if men under 75 could benefit from screening.

Broccoli rich diet prevents prostate cancer

Eating one or more portions of broccoli every week can reduce the risk of prostate cancer, and the risk of localised cancer becoming more aggressive. – For the first time, a UK research group at the Institute of Food Research led by Professor Richard Mithen has provided an explanation of how eating broccoli might reduce cancer risk based upon studies in men, as opposed to trying to extrapolate from animal models.

New therapy promising for melanoma skin cancer

The combination of two different biotherapies may be beneficial for patients with inoperable melanoma, according to a University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) study presented at the 44th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago. – The combination of two different biotherapies (interferon alfa-2b and tremelimumab) may be beneficial for patients with inoperable melanoma, revealed by researchers in US.

New melanoma gene close to be identified

Results published today from a study led by researchers from The Translational Genomic Research Institute (TGen) in Phoenix, Arizona and The Queensland Institute of Medical Research (QIMR), Queensland, Australia, however, may yet change these statistics. The team is close to discovering a new gene that could help explain variation in melanoma risk. – The researchers are close to discovering a new gene that could help explain variation in melanoma risk. They have identified a region on chromosome 20 (20q11.22) that influences a person’s risk of developing melanoma.

Melanoma skin cancer rising in Victoria

Number of Victorians affected by melanoma is at the highest level ever. Melanoma overtook lung cancer and is now the fourth most common cause of cancer in Victorians. – New figures from The Cancer Council Victoria show that the number of Victorians affected by melanoma is at the highest level ever. Latest figures from the Victorian Cancer Registry show that in 2005, melanoma overtook lung cancer and is now the fourth most common cause of cancer in Victorians.

45% fall in Australian teens seeking a tan

New campaign warns ‘No tan is worth dying for’, Big fall in teens seeking a tan, says Cancer Council: Yet a quarter still get sunburnt on summer weekends. – New research from The Cancer Council, Australia has shown a big fall in the number of teens deliberately tanning, down 45 per cent over the past three years. Yet despite the promising trend, almost a quarter of teens are still getting sunburnt over a typical summer weekend.

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