Smart healthy snacks in US schools

USDA Proposes Standards to Provide Healthy Food Options in Schools — New “Smart Snacks in School” proposal to ensure vending machines, snack bars include healthy choices – Good nutrition lays the groundwork for good health and academic success. Providing healthy options throughout school cafeterias, vending machines, and snack bars will complement the gains made with the new, healthy standards for school breakfast and lunch so the healthy choice is the easy choice for our kids.

Cafeteria diet increases stroke risk

‘Cafeteria diet’ hastens stroke risk — High-sugar, high-salt intake creates ‘a ticking time bomb of health problems’ – The fat- and sugar-rich Western diet leads to a lifetime of health problems, dramatically increasing the risk of stroke or death at a younger age,. Researchers found that a high-calorie, high-sugar, high-sodium diet nicknamed the ‘cafeteria diet’ induced most symptoms of metabolic syndrome ? a combination of high levels of cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure and obesity ? in rats after only two months.

Why do male avoid veggies

You are what you eat: Why do male consumers avoid vegetarian options? – Why are men generally more reluctant to try vegetarian products? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are influenced by a strong association of meat with masculinity.

Fair skin people may need vitamin D supplements

Pale people may need vitamin D supplements — Fair-skinned people may need extra vitamin D in their diet – Researchers at the University of Leeds, funded by Cancer Research UK, suggest that people with very pale skin may be unable to spend enough time in the sun to make the amount of vitamin D the body needs – while also avoiding sunburn.

Fast food customers cut calories after US food labeling system

1 in 6 fast-food customers cut calories after US food labeling system introduction — Changes in energy content of lunchtime purchases from fast-food restaurants after introduction of calorie labeling – Around a sixth of fast food customers used calorie information and, on average, bought food with lower calories since the introduction of a labelling system in the US, says a new study published.

US children eating more and more frequently outside home

Eating location increasingly important factor in diet of American children, according to new study in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association – As childhood obesity rises and the American diet shifts towards increasing consumption of foods eaten or prepared outside of the home, concerns about the nutritional quality and the total consumption of such foods are also increasing.

Lower calorie foods purchased in restaurants contain more calories than listed

Nutrition researchers examine restaurants’ calorie counts — New study suggests lower calorie foods purchased in restaurants contain more calories than listed – Disclosing the calories in restaurant foods to customers holds promise as a strategy to lower the nation’s obesity rate. However, a new study of food items from national chain restaurants found that while stated calories on restaurant menus and websites were accurate on average, 19% of individual samples differed from laboratory measurements by more than 100 calories and lower calorie foods tended to contain more than listed.

People eat less when they have big forks

Size matters: Why do people eat less when they have big forks? – Larger portion sizes usually mean we eat more food, but according to new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, bigger bites lead to eating less-in restaurant settings.

Vitamin D deficiency in pneumonia patients risky

Vitamin D deficiency in pneumonia patients associated with increased mortality – A new study published in the journal Respirology reveals that adult patients admitted to the hospital with pneumonia are more likely to die if they have Vitamin D deficiency.

Most obese adolescents lacking vitamin D

Obese adolescents lacking vitamin D — New study from Hasbro Children’s Hospital finds need for increased surveillance – A new study from Hasbro Children’s Hospital has found that most obese adolescents are lacking in vitamin D. The researchers call for increased surveillance of vitamin D levels in this population and for further studies to determine if normalizing vitamin D levels will help to lower the health risks associated with obesity.