Men and women need different diets

Diet can strongly influence how long you live and reproduce, but now scientists have discovered that what works best for males may not be best for females. – Gender plays a major role in determining which diet is better suited to promoting longer life or reproductive success, revealed by researchers from the University of New South Wales, the University of Sydney and Massey University.

Children’s food products provide poor nutritional quality

Approximately 89% of the children products analysed could be classified as of poor nutritional quality owing to high levels of sugar, fat and/or sodium. – Nine out of ten regular food items aimed specifically at children have a poor nutritional content ? because of high levels of sugar, fat or sodium – according to a detailed study of 367 products published in the July issue of the UK-based journal Obesity Reviews.

Men prefer meat, women prefer fruits and vegetables

Men are more likely to report eating meat and poultry items and women are more likely to report eating fruits and vegetables. – When it comes to what we eat, men and women really are different according to scientific research presented at the 2008 International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases in Atlanta, Georgia. In general, men are more likely to report eating meat and poultry items and women are more likely to report eating fruits and vegetables.

Less folate in diet cause abnormal sperm

Healthy men who report lower levels of the nutrient folate in their diets have higher rates of chromosomal abnormalities in their sperm. – Healthy men who report lower levels of the nutrient folate in their diets have higher rates of chromosomal abnormalities in their sperm, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

High GI diets lead to common lifestyle diseases

In the world’s first study of its kind, University of Sydney researchers have found conclusive evidence that diets with a high GI (Glycemic Index – a measure of how different foods affect your blood glucose levels) leads to a higher risk of common lifestyle diseases. – In the world’s first study of its kind, University of Sydney researchers have found conclusive evidence that diets with a high GI (Glycemic Index) leads to a higher risk of common lifestyle diseases.

Gastric acid protects against foodborne diseases

Gastric acid protects against foodborne diseases

Low levels of gastric acid in the stomach can increase one?s likelihood of getting a foodborne infection. – A new study suggests that low levels of gastric acid in the stomach can increase one’s likelihood of getting a foodborne infection. The researchers from Australia report their findings in the February 2008 issue of the journal Infection and Immunity.

Vitamin E increases tuberculosis risk in smokers

Vitamin E supplementation may transiently increase tuberculosis risk in males who smoke heavily and have high dietary vitamin C intake. – Six-year vitamin E supplementation increased tuberculosis risk by 72% in male smokers who had high dietary vitamin C intake, but vitamin E had no effect on those who had low dietary vitamin C intake, according to a study published in the British Journal of Nutrition.

Better nutrition in childhood increases productivity in adulthood

Study first to show improving nutrition in early childhood leads to significantly higher incomes in adulthood. – Feeding very young children a high-energy, high-protein supplement leads to increased economic productivity in adulthood, especially for men, according to a study published in the current issue of The Lancet, a leading medical journal.

Vitamin D deficiency may increase heart disease risk

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with incident cardiovascular disease. Further clinical and experimental studies may be warranted to determine whether correction of vitamin D deficiency could contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. – The same vitamin D deficiency that can result in weak bones now has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, Framingham Heart Study researchers report in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Kids eat more fruits, vegetables

One of the major contributing factors to the high rate of overweight children in the United States is that they do not consume the daily recommended servings of fruits and vegetables.
– A new UCLA study has found that elementary schools can significantly increase the frequency of fruit and vegetable consumption among low-income students by providing a lunch salad bar.