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Cervical Cancer - Health Newstrack

Cervical cancer is a malignancy of the cervix, second most common cancer of women. It may present with vaginal bleeding but symptoms may be absent until the cancer is in advanced stages, which has made cervical cancer the focus of intense screening efforts utilizing the Pap smear. Most scientific studies point to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as a necessary pre-requisite for development of cervical cancer.

A new study from the University of Illinois confirms a link between routine Pap smear screenings and a lower risk of developing cervical cancer in women over age 65….

Barriers to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among adolescents in the U.S. range from financial concerns and parental attitudes to social influences and concerns about the vaccination’s effect on sexual…


A rising percentage of parents say they won’t have their teen daughters vaccinated to protect against the human papilloma virus, even though physicians are increasingly recommending adolescent vaccinations. More…


The HPV vaccine not only has resulted in a decrease in human papillomavirus infection in immunized teens but also in teens who were not immunized. The study is believed…


HPV vaccination does not reduce progression to cervical disease in women, but vaccinated women had less frequent subsequent cervical disease. Women who are diagnosed with pre-cancerous cervical conditions after…


Women who undergo Pap tests have higher survival rates of cervical cancer. Women can boost their chances of surviving cervical cancer substantially through regular cervical screening, claims a research…


Implementation of HPV DNA testing in cervical screening leads to earlier detection of clinically relevant CIN grade 2 or worse, which when adequately treated, improves protection against CIN grade…


IUDs or intrauterine contraceptive devices could substantially reduce the risk of women developing cervical cancer, revealed by researchers in a recent study in Lancet Oncology. Xavier Castellsagu? and…


Many physicians reported overscreening women by using both the HPV and Pap tests annually. Clinical guidelines recommend screening low-risk women for cervical cancer every three years after age 30.


The overall potential benefits of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccinations or frequent HPV screenings for women over the age of 41 are low, concludes a new study published online February…

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