Routine pap smear screenings may prevent cervical cancer in elderly women

A new study from the University of Illinois confirms a link between routine Pap smear screenings and a lower risk of developing cervical cancer in women over age 65. However, most American health guidelines discourage women in that age range from receiving screenings unless they have pre-existing risk factors. “Some studies report that Pap smears … Read more

Diabetes duration and advancing age independently predict diabetes complications

Duration of diabetes and advancing age independently predict diabetes complications, risk of death – The duration of diabetes and advancing age independently predict diabetes severity and risk of death in older adults with type 2 diabetes. In a new study led by Kaiser Permanente and the University of Chicago, researchers investigated contemporary rates of diabetes complications and risk of death then contrasted them across categories of age and duration of diabetes.

Older people exposed to aircraft noise may face hospitalization from heart problems

Older people exposed to aircraft noise may face greater risk of hospitalization from heart problems – Older people exposed to aircraft noise, especially at high levels, may face increased risk of being hospitalized for cardiovascular disease. Researchers found that, on average, zip codes with 10-decibel higher aircraft noise had a 3.5% higher cardiovascular hospital admission rate.

Americans could save $770 billion due to slowdown in health care spending

Saving money on medical costs — Slowdown in health care spending growth could save Americans $770 billion, study finds – A slowdown in the growth of U.S. health care costs could mean that Americans could save as much as $770 billion on Medicare spending over the next decade, Harvard economists say.

U.S. dementia care costs going to rise

NIH-supported study finds U.S. dementia care costs as high as $215 billion in 2010 — Formal and unpaid dementia care costs are tallied – The costs of caring for people with dementia in the United States in 2010 were between $159 billion to $215 billion, and those costs could rise dramatically with the increase in the numbers of older people in coming decades, according to estimates by researchers at RAND Corp. and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Affordable Care Act highlighted by Kathleen Sebelius on National Public Health Week

HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius Statement on National Public Health Week – As US celebrate the start of National Public Health Week, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius emphasised the benefits of the Affordable Care Act to advance the public’s health, which started 3 years ago in America under the leadership of US president Barack Obama.

Medicare hospice benefit – better care at a lower cost

Medicare patients who use hospice receive better care at a lower cost to the government – Medicare patients who enrolled in hospice received better care at a significantly lower cost to the government than those who did not use the Medicare hospice benefit. The data indicate that annual savings to Medicare could amount to $2.4 million to $6.4 million.

Fitness at 50 – free from chronic illness

Midlife fitness staves off chronic disease at end of life, UT Southwestern researchers report — Fitness at 50 – free from chronic illness – Being physically fit during your 30s, 40s, and 50s not only helps extend lifespan, but it also increases the chances of aging healthily, free from chronic illness. For decades, research has shown that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels lessen the risk of death, but it previously had been unknown just how much fitness might affect the burden of chronic disease in the most senior years ? a concept known as morbidity compression.

US government paying separate managed care programs for same patients

Study examines federal government payments to separate managed care programs for same patients – An analysis that included 1.2 million veterans enrolled in the Veterans Affairs health care system and Medicare Advantage plan finds that the federal government spends a substantial and increasing amount of potentially duplicative funds in these separate managed care programs for the care of same individuals.

Bevacizumab with chemotherapy provides no survival benefit for lung cancer patients

Adding drug to standard chemotherapy provides no survival benefit for older lung cancer patients – Adding the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) to the standard chemotherapy regimen for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ? an approach approved by the FDA in 2006 ? did not lead to significantly increase survival rates for patients over the age of 65 enrolled in Medicare.

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