Quitting alcohol improves mental well-being & quality of life

Quitting alcohol may improve health-related quality of life for women, especially their mental well-being, revealed by researchers. “More evidence suggests caution in recommending moderate drinking as part of a healthy diet,” says Dr. Michael Ni, School of Public Health and The State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, University of Hong Kong (HKU). The … Read more

Processed foods during pregnancy increases autism risk in children

With the number of children diagnosed with autism on the rise, the need to find what causes the disorder becomes more urgent every day. UCF researchers are now a step closer to showing the link between the food pregnant women consume and the effects on a fetus’ developing brain. Drs. Saleh Naser, Latifa Abdelli and … Read more

Probiotic use linked to brain fogginess & bloating

Probiotic use can result in a significant accumulation of bacteria in the small intestine that can result in disorienting brain fogginess as well as rapid, significant belly bloating, investigators report. In a published study of 30 patients, the 22 who reported problems like confusion and difficulty concentrating, in addition to their gas and bloating, were … Read more

Montmorency tart cherries may enhance gut health

Montmorency tart cherries may play a role in improving gut health, suggests a first-of-its kind human trial of nine adults combined with a parallel laboratory study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. In the human trial, these nine healthy adults, 23-30 years old, drank 8 ounces of Montmorency tart cherry juice (from concentrate) daily … Read more

lifestyle-dementia

3 lifestyle changes may slow onset of dementia

Evidence supporting three interventions that might slow cognitive decline and the onset of dementia is encouraging — Cognitive training, blood pressure management for people with hypertension, and increased physical activity all show modest evidence that they can help prevent cognitive decline and dementia. “There is good cause for hope that in the next several years … Read more

Omega-3 can reduce aggressive behavior in children in three months

Incorporating omega-3, vitamins and mineral supplements into the diets of children with extreme aggression can reduce this problem behavior in the short term, especially its more impulsive, emotional form. These findings are published by University of Pennsylvania researchers in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. Adrian Raine, the Richard Perry University Professor of Criminology, … Read more

Raspberries good for patients with heart disease, diabetes, obesity and Alzheimer’s

Components in red raspberries may have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and metabolic stabilizing activity, according to a comprehensive review of the available scientific literature. These properties shed light on the potential role of red raspberries in helping to reduce the risk of metabolically-based chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and Alzheimer’s disease: all of which … Read more

Viral infection during pregnancy may be linked to autism-like behaviors in babies

A study published in the journal Science found that activation in pregnant mice of a particular immune response, similar to what may occur with certain viral infections during pregnancy, alters the brain structure of the mouse offspring and causes behavioral changes, reminiscent of those observed in humans with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Several past human … Read more

Microcephaly birth defect rate surged after Zika outbreak in Brazil

Brazilian health ministry reported a rise in the number of newborn babies with uncommonly small heads – microcephaly, and suspect that the surge is linked to an outbreak of the mosquito-borne Zika virus. The number of babies born with suspected microcephaly since October has now reached 3893. Brazilian authorities have reported 3,893 new suspected cases … Read more

Zika virus affected baby born in Hawaii with microcephaly

The first case of brain damage linked to the Zika virus within the United States has been reported in Hawaii. The Hawaii State Department of Health said Friday that a baby born in an Oahu hospital with microcephaly — an unusually small head and brain — had been infected with the Zika virus, which is … Read more

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