Preventing disparities in colon cancer screening

How to prevent disparities in colon cancer screening – People living in poverty are less likely to be screened regularly for colorectal cancer — and more likely to develop the disease and die from it. How to end these disparities — and raise screening rates, lower disease rates, and prevent deaths?

Nut consumption lowers risk of diseases

Large study links nut consumption to reduced death rate — Research also shows people who eat nuts weigh less – In the largest study of its kind, people who ate a daily handful of nuts were 20 percent less likely to die from any cause over a 30-year period than were those who didn’t consume nuts, say scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Harvard School of Public Health.

Offspring of obese mothers may be spared health problems

Obese mums may pass health risks on to grandchildren — Experts found the offspring of obese mothers may be spared health problems – Health problems linked to obesity, like heart disease and diabetes, could skip an entire generation. Researchers have found that the offspring of obese mothers may be spared health problems linked to obesity, while their own children then inherit them.

Prevent colon cancer with colon cancer awareness

Work with your health care provider to find out what your personal risk is and how often you should be screened. Have you had your colon cancer screening test? – March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month in US. “Colon cancer can be prevented with screening and removal of any polyps before they develop into cancer” says Sheryl M. Ness, R.N., Mayo Clinic nurse educator.

Fitness at 50 – free from chronic illness

Midlife fitness staves off chronic disease at end of life, UT Southwestern researchers report — Fitness at 50 – free from chronic illness – Being physically fit during your 30s, 40s, and 50s not only helps extend lifespan, but it also increases the chances of aging healthily, free from chronic illness. For decades, research has shown that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels lessen the risk of death, but it previously had been unknown just how much fitness might affect the burden of chronic disease in the most senior years ? a concept known as morbidity compression.

Colon cancer and rectal tumor constitute a single type of cancer

Study shows colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer — The Cancer Genome Atlas generates genomic data for colon and rectal cancers that point to potential targets for treatment – The pattern of genomic alterations in colon and rectal tissues is the same regardless of anatomic location or origin within the colon or the rectum, leading researchers to conclude that these two cancer types can be grouped as one, according to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project’s large-scale study of colon and rectal cancer tissue specimens.

Vigorous physical activity reduced psoriasis in women

Vigorous physical activity associated with reduced risk of psoriasis – A study of U.S. women suggests that vigorous physical activity may be associated with a reduced risk of psoriasis. Psoriasis is an immunologic disorder characterized by systemic inflammation and scaling of the skin.

Antibody may cure variety of human cancers

Single antibody shrinks variety of human tumors transplanted into mice, Stanford study shows – Human tumors transplanted into laboratory mice disappeared or shrank when scientists treated the animals with a single antibody. This antibody works by masking a protein flag on cancer cells that protects them from macrophages and other cells in the immune system.

Regorafenib improves survival of colorectal cancer patients

Drug improves survival of colorectal cancer patients, trial results show – Regorafenib – an investigational drug – slowed the progression of tumors and lengthened the lives of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. This is the first novel agent in eight years to show improvement in overall survival of colon cancer patients who have run out of treatment options.

Gene expression changes in nasal cells may help identify lung cancer

Gene expression changes in nasal cells may help identify lung cancer in earliest stages – A simple, minimally-invasive technique using cells from the interior of the nose could help clinicians detect lung cancer in its earliest – and most treatable – stages, according to a study conducted by researchers in Boston.

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