Yoga improves quality of life in breast cancer women

Yoga regulates stress hormones and improves quality of life for women with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy – For women with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy, yoga offers unique benefits beyond fighting fatigue. Researchers found that yoga exercises counteracted fatigue and improved ability to engage in their daily activities, better general health and better regulation of cortisol (stress hormone).

Women specific chest pain symptoms not enough in heart attack diagnosis

Findings Not Supportive of Women-Specific Chest Pain Symptoms in Heart Attack Diagnosis – Using chest pain characteristics (CPCs) specific to women in the early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI, heart attack) in the emergency department does not seem to be supported by the findings of a study published by JAMA.

Evidence based treatments decrease risk of death among heart attack patients

Increase in Use of Evidence-Based Treatments is Followed By Decrease in Risk of Death Among Patients With Heart Attack – In an analysis of data from a coronary care registry in Sweden, between 1996-2007 there was an increase in the prevalence of use of evidence-based invasive procedures and pharmacological therapies for treatment of a certain type of heart attack, and a decrease in the rate of death at 30 days and one year after a heart attack for these patients.

Eating disorder cutoffs miss some of sickest patients

Eating disorder cutoffs miss some of sickest patients, Stanford/Packard study finds – Diagnostic cutoffs for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa may be too strict, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital has found.

Safety concern for HIV drug combination

FDA Announces Possible Safety Concern for HIV Drug Combination – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced preliminary data suggesting that Invirase (saquinavir) in combination with Norvir (ritonavir) may have potentially important adverse effects on the heart.

New imaging technology reveals silent heart attacks

New imaging technology reveals prevalence of ‘silent’ heart attacks – So-called “silent” heart attacks may be much more common than previously believed, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center.

10 genes identified in connection with sudden cardiac death

You’re sitting at your desk and suddenly your heart is beating in overdrive or worse, lurching along like a car on fumes. It is a shocking, uncomfortable and frightening sensation. – Irregular heart rhythms are a common cause of sudden cardiac death or SCD, a condition that accounts for 450,000 deaths annually in the United States.

Heart attack cases reduced in US

Less severe first heart attacks linked to heart disease death reductions – The severity of first heart attacks has dropped significantly in the United States – propelling a decline in coronary heart disease deaths, researchers reported in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Heart screening for athletes would save lives

Mandatory heart screenings for all athletes could detect potentially fatal problems and save lives, revealed by researchers. – Heart screening for athletes before competition should be mandatory. The findings show that a pre-participation screening programme, which involves checking the activity of the heart during exercise, would detect more athletes at risk of sudden cardiac death and save lives, say the authors.

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