Unlocking the Genetics of Caffeine: How it Can Impact Body Fat and Type 2 Diabetes Risk

A recent study suggests that individuals with a certain genetic predisposition who have a high level of caffeine in their blood may experience a reduction in body fat and a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Previous studies had established a correlation between coffee consumption and a reduced risk of diabetes, but this research used the Mendelian randomisation technique to establish causation through genetic evidence.

The researchers identified two common genetic mutations, CYP1A2 and AHR, which affect caffeine metabolism in the body. People with variations in these genes metabolise caffeine more slowly, resulting in higher levels of caffeine in their blood even after consuming a small amount of caffeinated beverages.

The study’s findings suggest that caffeine might explain the inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes. However, the study has several limitations, including the use of only two genetic variants and a predominantly European sample.

Randomised controlled trials are required to determine whether non-caloric caffeine-containing beverages can play a role in reducing the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Key Takeaways in a Nutshell – Health Newstrack

1. High levels of caffeine in the blood may curb body fat and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in individuals with a certain genetic predisposition.

2. People with variations in these genes metabolise caffeine more slowly, resulting in higher levels of caffeine in their blood even after consuming a small amount of caffeinated beverages.

3. The study’s findings suggest that caffeine might explain the inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes.


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