Abnormal breathing during sleep may cause behavioral difficulties in kids

Young children with sleep-disordered breathing are prone to developing behavioral difficulties such as hyperactivity and aggressiveness, as well as emotional symptoms and difficulty with peer relationships.

The study of more than 11,000 children followed for over six years.

“This is the strongest evidence to date that snoring, mouth breathing, and apnea [abnormally long pauses in breathing during sleep] can have serious behavioral and social-emotional consequences for children,” said study leader Karen Bonuck, Ph.D., professor of family and social medicine and of obstetrics & gynecology and women’s health at Einstein.

Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is a general term for breathing difficulties that occur during sleep. Its hallmarks are snoring (which is usually accompanied by mouth breathing) and sleep apnea. SDB reportedly peaks from two to six years of age, but also occurs in younger children. About 1 in 10 children snore regularly and 2 to 4 percent have sleep apnea, according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology?Health and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS). Common causes of SDB are enlarged tonsils or adenoids.

The new study analyzed the combined effects of snoring, apnea and mouth-breathing patterns on the behavior of children enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a project based in the United Kingdom.

Parents were asked to fill out questionnaires about their children’s SDB symptoms at various intervals, from 6 to 69 months of age. (Studies of similar questionnaires have shown that parents do a good job of assessing kids’ SDB: their evaluations compare well with data from carefully controlled overnight sleep studies, Dr. Bonuck reports.) .

“We found that children with sleep-disordered breathing were from 40 to 100 percent more likely to develop neurobehavioral problems by age 7, compared with children without breathing problems,” said Dr. Bonuck. “The biggest increase was in hyperactivity, but we saw significant increases across all five behavioral measures.”

“Although snoring and apnea are relatively common in children, pediatricians and family physicians do not routinely check for sleep-disordered breathing,” said Dr. Bonuck. “In many cases, the doctor will simply ask parents, ‘How is your child sleeping?’ Instead, physicians need to specifically ask parents whether their children are experiencing one or more of the symptoms-snoring, mouth breathing or apnea-of SDB.”

The study was supported by grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.

Source: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA



Leave a Comment

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!