Unified effort needed to save lives by increasing use of CPR

Quick initiation of CPR (Cardiopulmonary resuscitation), as well as providing high quality CPR, is crucial to survival from sudden cardiac arrest. – A unified effort by the public, educators and policymakers is needed to reduce deaths from sudden cardiac arrest by increasing the use and effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), according to a new statement from the American Heart Association.

Vitamin D deficiency may increase heart disease risk

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with incident cardiovascular disease. Further clinical and experimental studies may be warranted to determine whether correction of vitamin D deficiency could contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. – The same vitamin D deficiency that can result in weak bones now has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, Framingham Heart Study researchers report in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Arthritis drug celecoxib can adversely affect heart rhythm

There has been much concern about the possibility of increased risk for heart attack and stroke in users of NSAID drugs, particularly COX-2 selective NSAIDs such as celecoxib. – COX-2 inhibitors like Celecoxib have come under scrutiny lately due to adverse cardiovascular side-effects stemming from COX-2 reduction. In both fruit fly and rat models, researchers reveal another adverse effect of Celecoxib; this drug can induce arrhythmia. More interestingly, this effect is independent of the COX-2 enzyme.

Combined with exercise, cholesterol increase muscles

If you?re worried about high cholesterol levels and keeping heart-healthy as you get older, don?t push aside bacon and eggs just yet. A new study says they might actually provide a benefit. – Combined with exercise, cholesterol appears to play a role in contributing to muscle gain. Surprise – cholesterol may actually pose benefits, study shows.

More teen women battling heart disease

At the age of 18, most young women are embarking on adulthood without a care in the world?health included. But experts at UC say that shouldn?t always be the case. – University of Cincinnati UC experts urge women to watch for warning signs associated with heart disease, a condition that is becoming more common, especially among women.

Stress may condition heart to survive heart attack

University of Cincinnati researchers reveal that people who experience brief periods of blocked blood flow may be better conditioned to survive a full-blown heart attack later. – People who experience brief periods of blocked blood flow may be better conditioned to survive a full-blown heart attack later, according to new research from the University of Cincinnati (UC).

Education programs lead to better health in heart patients

University of Michigan researchers revealed that heart patients find education programs lead to better health. – Older women heart patients benefit from educational programs as a supplement to clinical care to help significantly lower cardiac symptoms, lose weight and increase physical activity, a new study shows.

GIP hormone to prevent obesity

Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) hormone in the body is capable of promoting weight loss, improving insulin resistance and reversing diabetes. – A new study finds that a chemical found in the body is capable of promoting weight loss, improving insulin resistance and reversing diabetes in an animal model. The hormone is gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) receptor blockade.

Older surgical patients at greater risk for developing cognitive problems

Patients over the age of 60 who have elective surgeries such as joint replacements, hysterectomies and other non-emergency, inpatient procedures, are at an increased risk for long-term cognitive problems, according to a new study led by Duke University Medical Center researchers. – Duke University Medical Center researchers reveal that the patients over the age of 60 who have elective surgeries such as joint replacements, hysterectomies and other non-emergency, inpatient procedures, are at an increased risk for long-term cognitive problems.

Quit Smoking ? a Healthy Start to 2008

Smokers should make a new year’s resolution to give up the habit. The Australian Medical Association AMA is urging all smokers to put their health first in 2008. – The Australian Medical Association AMA is urging all smokers to put their health first in 2008 by making a New Year’s resolution to quit smoking for good.

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